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When is America Going to Catch Up to Europe?

Sean McDermott

Posted on March 7, 2021 03:41

3 users

America touts itself as economically and technologically advanced, but laws and statistics show much of Europe is at least a decade or more ahead of America.

Lifetime residents of the United States are prone to being as blind as love itself. "We won the biggest wars! We got to the moon! We made the bomb! We are the best, and there's no one better! God bless America!" 

As a natural born citizen of the nation, I myself have had the emotional blackmail and weaponized guilt placed into my head since childhood; honor the flag, cherish the ground you walk on, and watch how you question how good you really have it here in America. 

Even as I have gotten older, heard about some of the privileges and entitlements available in Europe, and had my chance to travel to Europe, I still believe my heart will always belong in at least one place in the United States. Nevertheless, America's top brass refuses to even entertain some of the things Europe has already made possible. Let's delve into some of the advantages to living in Europe as opposed to living in America. 

Let's start with work-life balance. Among many other implementations that favor those making industry's wheels turn, Europe has laws on the books allowing citizens to take up to four weeks vacation. Europeans are encouraged to reduce stress, travel with family, and enjoy life's smaller things. As a matter of fact, after visiting family of my own in Belfast, Ireland three years ago, my eldest half-brother was telling me about his plans to take his family to Portugal on "holiday" shortly after I was due to fly back home to New Jersey. 

I haven't been back to visit Belfast since, and many reasons pertain to this very topic: America guarantees no vacation time. The employer I started working for after my trip did not permit vacation time until at least one full year of employment, allowed only 2 sick days in addition to this, and because I missed three days from the flu after my one year mark, my vacation time was cut down to four days. 

Also, I often felt drained after a full week of work. 45-50 hours of darting back and forth across a solid-floor warehouse in steel toe boots wasn't the most I worked in my working career, but it was enough to make me want to spend an entire week with my sore feet up (nevermind rushing to fly over and be on my feet with family for one week.) Full-time, in most of Europe, is roughly 37 hours and rarely exceeds 40+ hours.

The U.S.'s argument of the strongest technological country isn't off by much, but is not accurate compared to Norway, Sweden, Netherlands, and Denmark; all of which reduce America to 5th in the world, according to Global Finance. 

American workers have developed Stockholm Syndrome while Europe has led the way in labor laws and technological advancement. There are other Americans who see Europe's economy hasn't collapsed with their laws, and they aren't moving to Europe. They are fighting for them right at home.

Sean McDermott

Posted on March 7, 2021 03:41

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Source: Vox - All

People stand in line at the entrance to the Space Mountain at Disneyland Paris in Marne-la-Vallee in August 2015. French...

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