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U.S. v. The Hague

Robert Franklin

Posted on September 14, 2018 10:40

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John Bolton appeared before the Federalist Society to demonize the International Criminal Court before the court delivers its answer on whether or not prosecutors can investigate allegations of war crimes committed by the United States government in Afghanistan.

National Security Advisor John Bolton has made the President's position on the International Criminal Court (ICC) crystal clear: the court is "the Founders' worst nightmare come to life."

In a speech delivered to the conservative Federalist Society on Monday, Bolton took the ICC to task, calling it "illegitimate," "unchecked," and "antithetical to our nation's ideals," strengthening the structural integrity of the echo chamber conservatives have built around this court since it was ratified in 2002.

It appears that Bolton's speech is the Trump Administration's position on, and an indictment of, the court after learning that it's close to delivering an answer on whether or not it will authorize an investigation into allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by the United States government and the CIA in Afghanistan during the War on Terror.

Such an investigation, at least to Trump, would undermine the "America first" policies that have toxicly permeated into nearly every position the President holds on nearly every topic. It undermines the exceptionalist ballyhoo regurgitated by the President and his ilk.

It provides a legal process to determine whether a nation currently blinded by its moral lighthouse is capable, and willing, to violate its own ethics in the most egregious of ways to flex its muscles and punish those who transgress against them.

In short, an investigation into U.S. and CIA activities in Afghanistan during the War on Terror may confirm that the nation's positions and efforts following the 9/11 terrorist attacks does little to separate them morally from the same institutions they sought to destroy.

Over the years it's become general knowledge that the United States government authorized the usage of torture -- so-called "enhanced interrogation" -- to fuel military and intelligence efforts in the Middle East.

A 2014 report compiled and released by the bipartisan U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence publicized this. President Obama and Senator John McCain acknowledged this. Now, an international court tasked with prosecution of individuals and governments who commit these kinds of atrocious acts has set its sights on a government historically vocally antagonistic of war crimes and crimes against humanity, but has always managed to avoid being held to account for committing their own.

Another element of this response from the Trump Administration may also have to do with the ICC's sights being potentially set on Israel as well. The Israeli government's treatment of Palestinians, civilians and combatants, is also well-known. This could be why the State Department is closing down the Palestinian Liberation Organization office in Washington.

It just wouldn't be American involvement in international affairs if it didn't coddle Israel in the process.

It may be for the best if the United States can be held to account for the barbaric and xenophobic methods taken during the War on Terror. Someone needs to demonstrate that while the United States may believe itself to be the pillar of morality and exceptionalism in the world, such posturing does not exempt it from the rules it helped create.

Robert Franklin

Posted on September 14, 2018 10:40

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Source: TIME
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President Trump’s National Security Adviser John Bolton launched a broadside against the International Criminal Court...

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