The Latest

THE LATEST

THE LATEST THINKING

THE LATEST THINKING

The opinions of THE LATEST’s guest contributors are their own.

The Way We Talk

Maria Dorado

Posted on July 25, 2020 08:53

2 users

Let's address how we need to be aware of the problematic undertones in our language, especially when it comes to slang.

One of the hardest aspects of "growing up" is learning to correct people. As a young girl who grew up in the Latinx community, I was taught phrases like "calladita te ves más bonita" — which translates into "you look prettier when you're quiet" and is one of the various ways the value of submissiveness is pushed onto girls in the culture. 

Consequently, I've had a hard time in the past telling people when their language is ignorant, sexist, ableist, or other toxic terms that serve to oppress others or spread toxic messages. This has thankfully become easier over the last year or two. However, just because it becomes easier doesn't mean we can stop learning how to be more mindful of the language we use and the language we allow others to use in our presence — even if the language used isn't a slur. 

Perhaps one of the biggest — and most unfortunate — lessons I've learned is that it's almost always going to be uncomfortable because a lot of the times those we are correcting are those who we're related to, friends with (or who you have common friends with), or those we see on a regular basis. A lot of the times when this is happening, it's not necessarily meant as an insult but instead used as language that was once "okay" to use or that gets normalized as "slang."

What we have to realize is that categorizing certain terminology as slang can normalize toxic behavior, especially considering people tend to use the word outside of its proper definition. Let's take the word "simp," for example, since those active on sites like Twitter are likely familiar with the term. Dictionary.com defines it as "a slang insult for men who are seen as too attentive and submissive to women, especially out of a failed hope of winning some entitled sexual attention or activity from them."

While the definition may not come across as anything horrific, it is quite problematic. The main issue here is that the word is promoting toxic masculinity through the idea that men are less for being "attentive" to women and ultimately devalues women through the idea that men should be rewarded for their attentiveness. In addition, it infers that women should be the ones in a submissive position, not men.

Yet the word on social media is usually commented on posts where men reference respecting women whether it be their girlfriends, mothers, or women in general. We need to reach a place where a man saying he did something nice for a woman or respects them is the norm and not something being questioned or mocked through problematic language.

While there are other more crucial words to erase from our vocabulary, I think it's important to be aware that it is not always blatantly evident that words carry problematic undertones. We have to make it our goal to improve our language overall and question how certain terms we're accustomed to can be problematic.

Maria Dorado

Posted on July 25, 2020 08:53

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Source: FOX News

A Massachusetts college is now backpedaling after facing accusations of trying to stifle free speech by sending out a “Common...

THE LATEST THINKING

Video Site Tour

The Latest
The Latest

Subscribe to THE LATEST Newsletter.

The Latest
The Latest

Share this TLT through...

The Latest