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The Specter of Roy Moore

Robert Franklin

Posted on May 30, 2019 23:09

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It's pretty much a given that Roy Moore will challenge Doug Jones in 2020, in a rematch for Jeff Sessions' old Senate seat. If Republicans were smart, they'd abandon Moore.

Roy Moore is probably going to run against Alabama Democratic Senator Doug Jones in 2020. All evidence seems to point it. However, Roy Moore’s presence in national politics is the same as throwing a match in a kerosene-soaked dumpster filled with discarded clothes, oil drums, and thousands of pages of paper. Unfortunately, it does not appear the President, or his Republican cohorts, truly understand that the specter of Roy Moore is a haunting they should want no part of.
 
In late 2017, Jeff Sessions’ vacated Senate seat provided the coveted prize of a nationally-spectated special election between Jones and Moore. Alabamans had an important choice to make: a Democrat, or a credibly-accused sexual predator and pedophile.
 
Jones won, 50 percent to 48.3 percent, or just shy of 22,000 votes, and became the first Democrat to win a state-wide election in Alabama in twenty-five years.
 
But Jones’ win wasn’t without its controversy, as Moore initially refused to concede defeat, and later, a story broke that cyber security firm New Knowledge may have used tactics like those used by Russia in the 2016 general election to influence voter favor toward Jones.
 
For almost two years, Doug Jones has been largely silent in the Senate.
 
Alabama’s special election in 2017 highlights a significant issue with hyper-partisan politics. When one can justify voting for a candidate ideologically, without having to sift through extra baggage, the debate over the efficacy of said candidate can ultimately be left to politics and politics alone.
 
But this wasn’t the case when Roy Moore ran in 2017. He had baggage. Significant, reprehensible baggage. Baggage that 48.3 percent of voters in that election viewed as secondary to politics.
 
That’s why, even though most Alabaman voters threw their votes toward Jones, the moral fortitude of Alabama’s voting bloc has not been let off the hook. That’s the main takeaway, as far as I am concerned, from this election. Nearly half of participating Alabaman voters felt Roy Moore should represent them in the United States Senate despite the fact he has, several times over, been credibly accused of preying on underage girls.
 
This is the same kind of thinking that led nearly 63 million people to elect Donald Trump to the presidency, despite the litany of controversial, distasteful, and generally vile things that occurred or were revealed during his campaign.
 
What many people are all too quick to do these days is forget that our actions can speak, and speak volumes. What we do paints a picture of what we think, provides qualified evidence of things that would otherwise only exist inside our heads.
 
The subtext of our actions is why people have had a hard time with others they care about, having cast ballots for Trump in 2016.
 
That subtext, along with other recent news virulently spreading from the heart of Dixie, gives me almost no hope that come November 2020, Alabamans will place their morals over party and elect anyone but Roy Moore.

Robert Franklin

Posted on May 30, 2019 23:09

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Well, there’s at least one person who thinks Roy Moore can win the 2020 US Senate seat in Alabama — and that’s Roy Moore....

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