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The Reality of ADHD

Isabella Pham

Posted on October 12, 2020 03:18

3 users

Let's debunk some common misconceptions.

If you try to picture someone with ADHD, what's the first thing that comes to your mind? Chances are, you'll think of a rowdy young lad who is practically bouncing off the walls. Although this image doesn't seem harmful at first, it does include inaccurate stereotypes, and those preconceived notions have warped our perception of what ADHD really looks like. According to Dr. Craig Surman, a neuropsychiatrist and ADHD researcher at Harvard Medical School, "The notion that [ADHD] is a hyperactive boy condition is not correct," and here's why:

First of all, people who have ADHD aren't always energetic and restless. Dr. John M. Grohol explains that "There are three main components that make up ADHD: hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsiveness. Not everyone diagnosed with attention deficit [hyperactive] disorder has all three." Because hyperactivity is such a noticeable symptom, the other two are often overlooked, which can lead to certain people being undiagnosed, and not receiving the treatment they need. 

Secondly, ADHD doesn't just affect children; it's also prevalent in adults. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that about 4.4% of the U.S. adult population has it, and that "Approximately one-third of children diagnosed with ADHD retain the diagnosis into adulthood." As people with ADHD grow older, their symptoms may persist, but with slight alterations. For example, someone might frequently misplace their homework as a child, and then lose their keys as an adult.

Lastly, ADHD affects both males and females, but boys are three times more likely to be diagnosed than girls. This is because girls tend to have the inattentive type of ADHD, whereas boys tend to be more hyperactive and/or impulsive. You know what they say, the squeaky wheel gets the grease, and ADHD is no exception.

October is ADHD Awareness Month, so let's take the time to educate ourselves. It's a complicated topic with many different facets, but expanding our knowledge will be worth it. By learning more about this complex condition, we'll be able to understand others better, and, in some cases, we might even be able to understand ourselves better in the process.

Isabella Pham

Posted on October 12, 2020 03:18

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Source: ABQJournal

ADHD stands for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. It's a condition that is common in young a ...

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