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The Burdens of Immigration

Robert Franklin

Posted on January 27, 2020 18:31

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"Give me your tired, but not your poor..."

On Monday, the Supreme Court, by trademark 5-4 split, reversed the decision by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York to halt the implementation of a Trump Administration immigration policy linking permanent residency to the likelihood of public assistance needs.

Justices Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, Thomas, Alito, and Chief Justice Roberts (who is currently presiding over President Trump's impeachment trial) voted to undo the stay placed by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court, allowing the Trump Administration to implement a "wealth test" in determining whether or not someone applying for legal residency in the United States can obtain it.

It's another cruel burden to increasingly wicked immigration procedures by the 45th President of the United States.

Under this new policy, an expansion of the so-called public charge rule, immigration officers would consider such factors as age, education level, and an applicant's proficiency with the English language to determine whether they may, in the future, become a "public charge," or someone who would possibly need government assistance through programs like Medicaid, SNAP, or public housing vouchers.

It's a prejudicial policy, predicated on preposterous particularities to produce a divide between immigrants from countries that are disproportionately poor and those a bit more well-off. It appears to have been proposed with underdeveloped Latin American, African, and Asian countries in mind; immigrants from countries that have seen their ex-pats locked in cages along the Southern border without proper medical access, hygiene, nutrition, living space, and due process.

But why? What purpose does determining whether or not a prospective resident or citizen might take public assistance in the future serve in valuing their participation in the ebb and flow of the county?

According to the Trump Administration, prospective residents and citizens must be "self-sufficient," and by extending what factors may indicate a "public charge," the American immigration system can ensure that people seeking residency or citizenship won't ultimately utilize assistance programs.

So now we're at a point where the content of someone's character is not a good enough indicator of whether or not they deserve to be here. Their assets count, too. To be an American, you have to be well-off, or at least better off than one-fifth of the national population.

But we shouldn't be surprised. This is but another cog in a Trumpian machine that subjugates non-citizens looking to secure a better life for themselves and their families in a country that has, for over a century, boisterously boasted an attainable "American dream."

And while flashy turn-of-phrase and medicine show nationalistic narcissism still resonate with the world's immigrant population, this administration has made its contempt for such people as obvious as the need of these immigrants to escape the pestilential problems of their native lands for what they believe are greener pastures.

Should this continue, maybe we should change the poem on the Statue of Liberty:"Give me your tired, but not your poor... and your huddled masses? They'll end up in cages."

Robert Franklin

Posted on January 27, 2020 18:31

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A divided Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public...

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