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That Just Burns Me Up!

Randy DeVaul

Posted on November 9, 2019 09:09

3 users

Getting burned is not a pleasant experience. Here are some "hidden" hazards that cause significant burns to adults and children. Watch out for these hazards and remain safe at home!

Have you heard the saying, “That burns me up!” referring to something that makes you angry? I get angry at myself when I do something stupid which results in me getting hurt or something that causes my kids to be hurt. This article reminds us of "hidden" hazards around the house that cause burns and what to do if a burn occurs.

Do you have a curling iron? The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (USCPSC) reports 7,700 burn injuries requiring treatment occur annually to children five years of age or younger from touching a hot curling iron, or about half of all curling iron incidents. The other half are young women between 15-24 years old – those generally using a curling iron. No, not burned skin; these were eye burns from the hot curling iron touching their eyes while in use.

Another burn injury involves the use of batteries used in appliances. Approximately 3,700 people a year are treated in emergency departments for battery-related chemical burns. Approximately one in five is a child under the age of 16.

Besides old batteries leaking in an appliance, people get chemical burns from battery damage. According to the USCPSC, this type of incident occurs most commonly one of three ways:

1. Re-charging the wrong battery or charging it with the wrong charger. Trying to re-charge a battery not intended to be re-charged, the battery can overheat and rupture. If you have a rechargeable battery, use the proper battery charger intended for the size and type of battery you have.

2. Mixing batteries. Using alkaline and carbon-zinc batteries together in the same appliance or mixing old batteries with new freshly-charged ones in the same appliance, the batteries can overheat and rupture. Always use a complete set of new batteries of the same type when replacing batteries.

3. Putting batteries in backwards. If a battery is reversed (positive end where the negative end belongs and vice versa), it can overheat and rupture. This has happened when young children install batteries backwards. Warn children not to take out batteries or install them. Parents should install batteries in household appliances and children's toys.

So, if a burn occurs, what should you do? For a thermal burn – one caused by heat – note:

If the skin is red only – not blistered (2nd degree) or looking charred (3rd degree), use cool water on the burned surface to remove the heat from the skin. If the skin is damaged with a visible wound, place a dry sterile dressing over it and cool it with a cold pack and keep it dry, then take the person for medical treatment.

For chemical burns, remove the chemical by flushing the burned area with running water for at least 20 minutes. A quick rinse will not dilute or remove the chemical to stop the burning sensation.

Any burn of the eyes, regardless of cause, requires medical help.

Watch out for hidden burn hazards. Stay safe at home!

Randy DeVaul

Posted on November 9, 2019 09:09

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Source: Entrepreneur
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