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Rich, White Girls

Kassidy Barber

Posted on June 15, 2019 18:33

6 users

Global phenomenons Kesha and Taylor Swift are lighting up the pop industry with politically-charged lyrics, but not everyone is "here for it."

Pop stars Kesha and Taylor Swift are making waves in the industry with their new songs "Rich, White, Straight Men" and "You Need to Calm Down" respectively. These waves are either coming by way of people shouting "YAAS QUEEN" or others simply rolling their eyes and moving along. Let’s pick apart why reactions to the singers' new songs are so strong.

source:Washington Examiner

 

Kesha's "Rich, White, Straight Men" is less subtle than Swift's song. It makes direct references to current political happenings. For example, "If you're from another land, then come here/ You won't have to climb a wall" is followed by the (presumably) titular rich, white, straight man shouting "Yes, you will!" A reference which pretty much everyone gets. Subsequently, she says "If you are a boy who loves a boy/You'll get a wedding cake and all" followed by the shout, "Not in Colorado!" in direct reference to the Colorado case where a man refused to personalize a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. Because freedom of religion totally doesn’t exist anymore and there aren't several different cake shops within the vicinity one can visit without intentionally causing a scene. The issue with most of what she's saying isn't what she's saying, it's how she says it: littered with insubstantial anecdotes and copious expletives. Shouting less-than-decent language at your opposition isn't the best way to start a conversation or further your goals (unless I've been wrong all my life in my idea of what a dignified conversation should be).

 

image source: NME
source: NME

 

In Swift's "You Need to Calm Down", she makes both subtle and less-so references to her support of the LGBTQ community and her disdain towards those who disagree with her stance. The first point, which is made obvious by her lyric video, is "Why are you mad when you could be GLAAD?" in reference to the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. Following, she says "'cause shade never made anybody less gay." There's nothing wrong with Taylor's support of the LGBTQ community; the problem is that anyone who disagrees is instantly cast off as someone who is a "hater" or "throwing shade," which is a big issue with politics nowadays. People are so quick to write off opposing viewpoints as hatred or craziness instead of taking a second to perhaps listen to what they have to say and maybe learning something from someone who doesn't just agree with everything you believe.

Kesha and Swift have, more obviously than ever, put politics in center stage of their music, running the risk of isolating not only the members of their audience who disagree with their base views but also those who might agree with their stance yet disagree with the way they are fervently going about it all. Maybe instead of so pointedly lashing out at resistance to their own ideals while thrusting their own codes of morality every which direction, they should stick to donating more time to actual activism, not just singing about it.

Kassidy Barber

Posted on June 15, 2019 18:33

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Source: WDSU

Kesha took to social media on Tuesday evening to thank her fans for supporting her during her current legal battle with producer...

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