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Over 1,000 Seek Enlightenment at the StartEngine ICO 2.0 Conference

Jeff Hall

Posted on April 23, 2018 21:09

1 user

From "how to stay out of jail" to "how to provide Internet service to isolated African villages using laser beams," the recent StartEngine ICO 2.0 conference covered a lot of territory.

If a new technology can do something better/faster/cheaper, then it's on the road to becoming "disruptive," everyone's favorite buzzword in the startup community.

Think of what email did to snail mail.  Or what Napster did to music.  Or Netflix to movies.  Or Uber to taxis.  The list is so long now it's hard to keep track. 

Blockchain is considered by many to be the next big thing.  As a result, it's attracting lots of attention -- and investment capital. 

Many are still learning what blockchain is or does, and the rise of cryptocurrencies -- made possible by blockchain -- causes many to wonder if there's an inevitable crash right around the corner.

Indeed, many speakers at StartEngine's ICO 2.0 conference suggested we are now in 1999, back in the Internet go-go years -- right before the big crash.  But Internet companies that survived the crash and persisted -- think Amazon, Google and others -- were just getting started.

 

 Of the many companies given the chance to present their concepts at the ICO conference -- ICO stands for "Initial Coin Offering" -- it's hard to predict who will still be with us in ten years. 

Transactions requiring privacy and data security offer the most potential in the near-term, speakers agreed.  Blockchain makes it impossible -- we think -- for hackers to crack the code.  So healthcare, real estate, education, consumer loyalty programs and transportation seem to fit the bill in terms of opportunity provided.

When we say the data is secure, that doesn't mean a user might not get careless on the sending or receiving end of a transmission -- but, while in transmission, the data, sent via blockchain, is considered highly secure.

Kinsey Cronin and Howard Marks of StartEngine.

With blockchain, the record of a transaction is distributed across several online ledgers, and not parked all in one centralized place.  Any institution with centralized computers can be far more readily hacked than a transaction sent in pieces, with each piece potentially parked in a different location.

Given the attention being given these days to privacy and hacking, it's only natural that blockchain would be embraced by so many so quickly. 

The idea that one can create a viable currency out of digits -- and that these new currencies -- bitcoin, ethereum, etc. -- can create overnight millionaires and even billionaires -- is an exciting one, indeed. 

Yes, it felt a little like 1999 last Friday in Santa Monica.  But we now know what happened post-1999 and those willing to dig in now might be glad they did five or ten years from now. 

As one speaker put it, "Pioneers get the arrows; settlers get the land."


The wagon trains are just now leaving the Eastern cities, heading West.

There is still much to sort out -- regulations, technology, financing, etc.  Time will tell how it unfolds.

There was a lot of material covered at the conference. 

If you are interested in this topic, I highly recommend you visit StartEngine's YouTube Channel where you can watch all the presentations.

 

Jeff Hall

Posted on April 23, 2018 21:09

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Source: Phys.org

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