The Latest

THE LATEST

THE LATEST THINKING

THE LATEST THINKING

The opinions of THE LATEST’s guest contributors are their own.

Keeping, Changing and Making New Traditions

Kimberlee Leonard

Posted on May 23, 2018 23:36

1 user

New couples often have family traditions that differ in religious and cultural roots. While developing new traditions is great, it is important to integrate some of the old to help children develop a sense of self.

The Royal Wedding was a perfect example of a global union filled with diversification. It showed how each of us tries to integrate new things and make new traditions that make sense within the context of our lives. Sure, there was still a lot of tradition in the wedding. That is a good thing. Traditions help us form healthy bonds with our family and history.

 

I fear to start completely new traditions while forgoing all the old ones comes with a price to pay. When start to lose part of our identity when we walk away from all traditions we knew growing up.

 

Amy Griswold, a family life educator, says that young children remember the experiences of family traditions more than gifts or toys. Grounded children who have a sense of self and purpose are better adjusted. In other words, traditions are important. But they don’t always need to go back generations.

 

Like many of us, newlyweds like Harry and Meghan are trying to invite each other into their own family history by combining a little bit of each other’s respective traditions. As our culture becomes more diverse, we should celebrate all of our differences and integrate new traditions to help connect us to each other.

 

However, keeping some older, multi-generation traditions alive helps keep kids grounded and rooted in family history and culture. This is one component of family stability that can help kids searching for connection in today’s expanding world.

 

Children will remember all traditions as part of their upbringing. But without the traditions passed down from our grandparents and great-grandparents, we can lose touch with some of the things that help to bind us to our family. Even in the most stressful family dynamics, traditions provide comfort and security to children. These feelings extend into adulthood.

 

All of us have that comfort food that mom or grandma made for us when we were sick. Many of us still seek that as adults. Some new traditions are combinations of the old. A family might have a Christmas tree and a Hanukkah Menorah for the holidays, combining religious traditions of both parents.

 

Of course, there are some traditions that just can’t be kept. Perhaps they are due to geographical or economic problems. Sometimes a tradition represented something that perhaps you aren’t proud of in your family. Don’t be afraid to explain this to children. Use these moments to teach the next generation why old traditions aren’t always good and why things are changing.

 

Whatever traditions a couple chooses to keep, it should feel good. Just like grandma’s comforting soup when you are sick, a tradition should instantly make you feel like a child again. Sharing these moments with your children and finding ones that are unique to your family is one way to build a strong sense of self.  Participating in the traditions of others helps to celebrate diversity. Both are needed in today’s ever-changing world. 

Kimberlee Leonard

Posted on May 23, 2018 23:36

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Source: POP SUGAR

It's no secret that the Royal Family is big on tradition. Some of them go back centuries - the garter ceremony and celebratory...

THE LATEST THINKING

Video Site Tour

The Latest
The Latest

Subscribe to THE LATEST Newsletter.

The Latest
The Latest

Share this TLT through...

The Latest