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Homegrown Terrorists Being Released from Prison

Robin Mizrahi

Posted on January 27, 2020 17:32

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According to the Bureau of Prisons, there are roughly 400 federal inmates with a connection to international terrorism that are scheduled for release in the next few years, and there is no program in place to monitor their activities once they’re out.

It’s been almost two decades since the West went to war against Islamic terrorism, and now many convicted homegrown terrorists are nearing the end of their prison sentences, and are being released back into society.

Have they been rehabilitated? Or did prison only reinforce their jihadi beliefs?

Two months ago, British Islamist terrorist Usman Khan—who had already been previously convicted of terrorist offenses and given a 16-year prison sentence—fatally stabbed two people and wounded three on London Bridge (before being shot and killed by police.) Kahn was released after only six years—ironically because he had taken part in a Cambridge University “prison rehabilitation” program called “Living Together.”

The U.S. is also releasing its homegrown terrorists, including John Walker Lindh, dubbed the "American Taliban",  who was 17 when he went to Afghanistan to fight alongside a band of Taliban fighters. After being captured by U.S. forces in 2001, and pleading guilty to carrying weapons and supporting the Taliban, Lindh was sentenced to 20 years in a high-security penitentiary. Last May he was given early release.

A National Counterterrorism Center (NCC) report says that while in prison Lindh continued “to advocate for global jihad and to write and translate violent extremist texts.” He also told a visiting news crew that he has not renounced extreme violence.

About 300 U.S. citizens have attempted to join jihadist groups in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Mali, Nigeria, the Sinai Peninsula, Somalia and Yemen. Many have died in battle or are currently unaccounted for, while a few are in prisons in Syria, Iraq and Turkey, as well as the U.S.

The 2018 National Counterterrorism Strategy warned that domestic terrorism in the United States is on the rise. With ISIS on the run and no longer protected by a physical caliphate, fewer would-be jihadists are traveling to Islamic hot spots, and might instead commit acts of terror here at home.

Five Americans jihadists—Umer Farooq, Ramy Zamzam, Aman Hassan Yasir, Waqar Khan and Ahmed Abdullah Minni, who in 2009 were sentenced to ten years in a Pakistani prison for trying to join Lashkar-e-Taiba, a Pakistani terrorist organization—are scheduled for release and will return to the United States as free citizens. An additional 17 adults—12 men and five women—who had traveled abroad to join jihadi movements, are back in the U.S., and 13 of them currently facing charges. 

According to the Bureau of Prisons, there are roughly 400 federal inmates with a connection to international terrorism that are scheduled for release in the next few years, and there is no program in place to monitor their activities once they’re out. 

The intelligence community is highly concerned about their potential for recidivism. At least 90 of them “will probably reengage in terrorist activity” says the NCC.

Robin Mizrahi

Posted on January 27, 2020 17:32

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Source: Denver Post

After a few years of fighting over health care and the economy, Colorado politicos again have turned their attention to terrorism...

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