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Hiroshima & Nagasaki's Lesson for the G-20 Summit

Laurence Jarvik

Posted on June 24, 2019 10:31

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The lesson to the G-20 in Osaka could not be clearer. Nuclear weapons are good for more than deterrence. They can win wars, end aggression, and remake once-belligerent societies into peaceful, prosperous, and cooperative members of the family of nations.

source: Laurence Jarvik

When President Trump meets Russian President Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Osaka G-20 summit June 28th, they might do well to consider the fate of Hiroshima and Nagasaki following the American victory in World War II. 

Both cities were quickly rebuilt with American aid. Today they are bustling. On a recent visit, we saw gigantic cruise ships docked in Nagasaki Harbor, disembarking thousands of Chinese tourists from Shanghai (see photo above).

On the way there, our bullet train sped through Hiroshima, stopping briefly at a modern station surrounded by high-rise apartments and office buildings.  

Both cities looked better than Baltimore, Buffalo, or Detroit.

Nagasaki's atomic bomb museum made clear that Japanese citizens responded quickly to their tragic suffering by sincere dedication to world peace.

The Japanese rejected militarism and imperialism, replacing their prior goal of world domination with support for the United States, liberal democracy, and mutual understanding (while protected by the American nuclear umbrella).

Unlike failed efforts at reconstruction in Iraq, Afghanistan, or elsewhere, using America's "nuclear option" in Japan resulted in a society that is safe, efficient, polite, pacifist--and a loyal American ally.

Aside from museums and memorials, there were no signs of any lingering damage from the bombings. People were hard at work, or enjoying themselves in shopping malls, restaurants, and parks.

Indeed, a friend who visited Nagasaki with the US Navy in 1961 told us the city was completely rebuilt by then--only 16 years later.

Compare that happy result to what has happened in Afghanistan or Iraq where fighting continues to this day despite trillions spent on "reconstruction." 

Likewise, our friend reported that the population was pro-American in 1961 just as they are today, from our experience.

Can one honestly say the same for Afghanistan or Iraq today?

Interestingly, General Douglas MacArthur remains popular among the Japanese, although perhaps not so much in the United States. Not only did he do a good job rebuilding the country, his efforts were appreciated by the Japanese then and now.

Can one say the same regarding the parade of generals who have rotated through Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11?

Of course the Japanese economy isn't what it once was, but it is still the third largest economy in the world. Today, the Japanese enjoy the longest life expectancy of anyone on earth.

Sadly, this isn't the case for Iraqis or Afghans today.

The lesson to the G-20 leaders in Osaka could not be clearer. Nuclear weapons are good for more than deterrence. They can win wars, end aggression, and remake once belligerent societies into peaceful, prosperous, and cooperative members of the family of nations.

Americans tend to forget that China and Russia were our allies against Imperial Japan (Russia joined after Hiroshima).

However, Chinese and Russian leaders remember and could revive that winning combination in Osaka against Iran and the Muslim Brotherhood, enabling an American "nuclear option" against Iran to finally avenge 9/11.

 

 

 

 

 

Laurence Jarvik

Posted on June 24, 2019 10:31

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Source: Phys.org

Survivors of the World War II atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Friday congratulated ICAN on winning this year's...

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