The Latest

THE LATEST

THE LATEST THINKING

THE LATEST THINKING

The opinions of THE LATEST’s guest contributors are their own.

Five Tips for Becoming a Better Writer

Robert Dimuro

Posted on April 7, 2019 15:55

1 user

I’ve been consistently writing for The Latest for about one year. Throughout this time, I developed and experimented with certain techniques and habits that have allowed me to get my best thinking onto the page in the best manner possible. In this article, I list five tips that I believe are invaluable to anyone trying to get started as a writer.

  1. Thinking too much is fatal. When I first started writing opinion pieces, every aspect of the writing process would ensnare me in endless thought - what to write about, how to express my opinion, how to introduce the topic, what grammatical usage is correct, etc. If you’re thinking, you’re not writing; therefore, most of your thinking should be taking place before and after your first draft, not during. There is plenty of downtime to think about what and how to write, such as when you’re taking a shower or commuting to and from work. If you must stop your writing to address a poorly worded thought, simply highlight the phrase and move on. No more than one third of the time should be allocated to writing the first draft, with the other two thirds allocated to brainstorming and revision.
  2. Eliminate all distractions. Creating a time block during which you can write in a non-distracting environment is crucial for every writer. I prefer to write in a quiet room in which, besides the slightest of background noises, I can only hear the humming of my laptop and the typing of my fingers. Writing in a Starbucks or Panera Bread is better suited for those who focus better in a public environment with constant background noise.
  3. Maintain a writing routine. For me, this is the hardest advice to follow. Many writers only write during certain times of the day. For instance, they may wake up early in the morning to write or do so at night until they are too tired to continue. Typically, distractions are minimal during these times. It’s always good to jot down ideas when they’re fresh in your head; however, sitting down to write your piece at random times isn’t conducive to writing efficiently and consistently. Moreover, your body and mind will be more prepared and eager to write if the time and place in which you do so remain consistent.
  4. Have others read over your work. As a writer, you have an inescapable bias towards your own writing. This means that how you perceive your writing is likely different from how it’s read by others. Therefore, it’s usually a good idea to incorporate suggestions from others on how to express certain thoughts and phrase certain sentences. Contributions from multiple minds lead to a better finished product than from only a single mind.
  5. Be willing to walk away from the keyboard. Every dog has its day, but it doesn’t have to be today. Sometimes thoughts simply don’t come to you, and it becomes a struggle to type a single sentence. If this happens to you, stop trying to write, do something else, and come back to it later. The pressure of being in front of a keyboard can suppress thought and creativity. Let thoughts come to you effortlessly, and, when they do, your writing will also be effortless.
Robert Dimuro

Posted on April 7, 2019 15:55

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Source: SAVEUR

Lifestyle Advice from our favorite bespectacled food-literary siblings Cookbook authors the Lee Bros share tips...

THE LATEST THINKING

Video Site Tour

The Latest
The Latest

Subscribe to THE LATEST Newsletter.

The Latest
The Latest

Share this TLT through...

The Latest