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Fifteen Seconds of Fame

Savannah Simpson

Posted on September 28, 2018 23:48

1 user

In a world where everyone wants to be famous, nobody gets to be.

The internet has opened up many new avenues of gaining instant-recognition. Vine created a portal from which talentless people could gain their fame by being clever for six seconds. Clever is a generous word for a lot of the content. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good Vine compilation as much as anyone, but from the ashes of that website rose a generation of Youtubers that all vie for the short attention of young people, hoping to make a buck off their naivety. They’re successful, and the results are dire.

There’s nothing bad about aiming for a goal. However, when everyone is trying to be rich and successful based on their personality, then no one gets to be. The internet is becoming flooded with copycats and look-alikes. Everyone is trying to use some version of the fame-formula. There are many attempts to go viral because that’s all it takes to give someone a career as a bag of air that talk to a camera. It doesn’t matter what they say, the cash is flowing. They’ve succeeded in their goal: be so outrageous one time, that people come back for more. There’s no demand to be that outrageous again. People will keep watching, with bated breath, for more drama.


The tactics of these modern internet stars tend to be manipulative, and they give kids a bad model of how to live to their lives. Flexing is the name of the current YouTube and Instagram game. Flash all your money, your good looks, and your mediocre personality, and watch as thousands of young minds absorb your content like sponges. They see themselves in that position, famous and successful without having to do anything. Living in a media-hub like Los Angeles, I encounter people my age who say things like, “I’ve got this YouTube channel” or “follow me on my Insta.”


I don’t agree with the mindset of blanket-terming all social media as toxic. Whatever the consequences have been, it’s become a primary source of information and discussion. There are YouTubers I enjoy, whose recognition is well-deserved. But some of the biggest accounts have some of lowest quality content. Their following is young people, whose attention spans are short and who are impressionable. Most of us grow out of our weird phases of fandom, but that’s not an excuse for these “stars” to manipulate young minds.


If the way 90's kids fondly remember Nickelodeon shows is anything to go by, then the content we consume as young people has some sort of impact on our growth. I worry for the generation that will be nostalgic over current YouTubers. The shallow content is a bad example.

I won’t say that any of the younger generations have an issue of entitlement. However, the belief that fame and success can be easily achieved by simply going viral is a dangerous one. Young people should be encouraged to have tangible aspirations, not a vapid dream to flex on social media.

Savannah Simpson

Posted on September 28, 2018 23:48

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Source: Your EDM

It's safe to say the Internet has dramatically changed the face of our world. Like the wheel, the discovery of fire and development...

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