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Feminism's Dance with Radical Islam

Joe Ranvestel

Posted on January 5, 2019 14:34

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At long last, Women's March organizers have addressed issues of Antisemitism within the ranks.

Organizers and participants of the Women's March have attempted to represent a fight against discrimination and bigotry since the inception of the event two years ago. But among the organizers, there have persisted some contradictory messages, and some controversial figures. In a story published by Tablet last March, three of the founders of the event gave praise to Louis Farrakhan during a conference call, an action that some women found appalling given his history of less than endearing qualities (anti-Semitism, homophobia, transphobia and sexism, to name a few). It seems that, at long last, the organizers of the Women's March have addressed participant concerns. 

An article from the L.A. Times obtained a quote from Linda Sarsour, one of the organizers, who went to express the group's concerns against association with bigotry, and a general resolve to do better as an organization. The author of the article then went on to downplay the prior actions of the organizers, making a connection to the hypocrisy of various unnamed Trump supporters, and expressing the general, feel good message the first Women's March sought to represent. 

But the messages from these organizers can't be ignored so easily. The remarks at the conference call may have taken a while to be heard, and the response to the criticism may have been delayed, but this root of radicalism was present since the beginning. Even outside of the Women's March organizers, we've seen this sentiment present throughout modern feminism. In the new culture of intersectionality, many feminists, for some reason, have chosen to join forces with radical Islam. An ideology that, at its base, is pretty contradictory to feminism. 

So to answer the headline question of the L.A. Times author, who asks "Can you admire Louis Farrakhan and still advance the cause of women?", I would urge against it. Because maybe you can, for a time, but you would eventually be destroying the cause of women. 

Joe Ranvestel

Posted on January 5, 2019 14:34

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