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Driving in a Heavy Downpour of Rain

Sidney Drabkin

Posted on November 24, 2018 07:15

1 user

If you are hydroplaning while driving, your tires are riding on top of water.

First heavy rain of the year caused the usual driving problems.

People do not remember how to drive in a heavy downpour of rain. They drive like they would on a clear day. 

Driving in a downpour, you have to slow down. You drive like you would at night, carefully and be aware of your surroundings. There is always a speeder, who does not know how to drive, but thinks he does, that causes accidents.

We had our first major rainstorm in California, where the rain came down very fast. A car passed us going at least 50 miles an hour, while the downpour was throwing a lot of water onto the oily road.

You could see that there was oil coming off the road and on top of the the rain. Anyone with driving experience knows that if you hit your breaks you would start to hydroplane—your tires ride on the water, not the pavement, and you go skidding out of control until you slow down and your tires reconnect to the pavement.  

But, of course, there was one driver who was going faster than the flow of traffic that passed us, curved into another lane, passed two more cars, and tried to curve back into another lane. 

His car hydroplaned into a light post. He was lucky that he did not hit several cars that he passed while going into the light post. 

Another car was to close too the car in front of him, he hydroplaned into the back end of another car. The drivers of these cars looked like they were in their twenties, or younger. 

I really think that age is not the only factor in more accidents on the road today. It’s also where they were trained to drive.

As an example, you take the state of Tennessee, they are trained, in my opinion, to drive slower and be more courteous on the road. 

In California, you have several types of drivers from different areas of the state: mountain drivers seem to be more careful than the city drivers; city drivers, who always seem like they are in a hurry to get somewhere; and valley drivers are fast drivers since most of the area is flat and it takes you longer to get from one area to another. 

To be able to drive in California you must follow the driver’s book that the DMV puts out, but the area you train in makes a big difference in your driving. 

Just remember, when it rains or snows slow down and keep a reasonable distance from the car or truck that is in front of you.  

Sidney Drabkin

Posted on November 24, 2018 07:15

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