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Choose All Schools

Nick Englehart

Posted on February 6, 2020 02:14

2 users

The glaring problems in the U.S education system have little to do with choosing where your kids get to go.

The average school day is too long. It also starts way too early and assigns too much work. It teaches our children too little of what they need and pays teachers too little for their time. The American school system is completely broken and it’s broken in so many different ways.

Trump's State of the Union put forth the idea that children shouldn’t be forced to go to schools that don’t work. That’s true. All children should have schools that work. But he’s wrong in that it’s a privilege and not a right.

One of the most glaring issues is that schools are still segregated. Schools in the South are as segregated now as they were fifty years ago. Two recent studies found that most school districts draw attendance borders to solidify already existing segregation. That compounding with local taxes funding the majority of school systems and many communities are immediately placed at a disadvantage.

Even if funding was even and the United States didn’t struggle with rampant discrimination our system still wouldn’t work. It turns out that the education of most students depends on external circumstances. Test scores and academic success correspond to a person’s background. The education level and income dictate their success and it has little to do with the quality of schools.

The solution might be to take government and oversight out of schools. In the eighties, government researchers blamed a failing economy on the education system and recommended increases in homework. American students now spend twice as much time on homework as in the nineties but have seen no increase in test scores.

This doesn’t mean private schools are the answer. Students who went to same-sex (private) schools were wealthier and therefore more prepared and proactive. Their test scores may be less correlative with better education and due more to their privileged environments. On the SATs, students from families earning more than $200,000 a year average a combined score of 1,714, while students from families earning under $20,000 a year average a combined score of 1,326.

Parents want what's best for their children. That makes it difficult to equalize education. A dollar spent on another child is a dollar they can’t spend on their own. It is inherently unfair to have to send your child to a, “Worse” school. The question of education is a question about the future of America. A single child will be better off in the long run if we take steps to improve everyone's education. Even at the possible detriment to one's own.

Nick Englehart

Posted on February 6, 2020 02:14

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