The Latest

THE LATEST

THE LATEST THINKING

THE LATEST THINKING

The opinions of THE LATEST’s guest contributors are their own.

Can Bloomberg Spend His Way to the Nomination?

Robert Dimuro

Posted on February 23, 2020 10:54

2 users

Either democratically or behind closed doors, Bloomberg has a strategy to oust the nomination from Sanders.

Democratic Candidate Mike Bloomberg (CC by 2.0)

 

Former NYC mayor Mike Bloomberg - the 12th richest person in the world - is betting on the power of money to catapult him to the nomination. So far, money alone has earned the newcomer a third-place spot in the national polling average as of February 21. Bloomberg justifies his enormous spending budget in that he’s "giving it all away" for the cause of defeating Trump, arguing that his spending makes every candidate stronger heading into November.

The actual figures for Bloomberg’s advertising budget are staggering. Since the start of 2020, his ads have appeared two billion times on Google and Facebook, averaging 30,000 ads per minute. In total, Bloomberg has spent $50 million on digital advertising, more than double what Trump has spent on digital and on television combined.

His television ad buys are even more staggering. In total, Bloomberg has spent $183 million on television, while the other candidates have combined to spend $100 million. His Super Bowl ad alone cost $11 million, which, in one shot, exposed his message to 100 million viewers. At the beginning of the month, the campaign announced that it would be doubling its digital and television spending, which would bring the grand total to over a whopping $600 million.

Bloomberg’s strategy to lift himself up from the ground (delegate-wise) hinges on the idea that all of this spending will garner him fruitful results on Super Tuesday, which will award over one-third of the 1,991 pledged delegates. This will be a tall order considering his poor debate performance and lack of winning momentum heading into the upcoming contests. However, it will be a tall order for any of the remaining candidates to rack up enough delegates to catch Sanders, who is now the undisputed frontrunner.

Bloomberg realizes this, which is why he’s also spending his money in a more clandestine fashion - secretly galvanizing support among Party leaders and donors so that he could be nominated in a possible brokered convention. Bloomberg has good reason to invest in this strategy: an anemic DNC, which has been outraised two-to-one by the RNC for the sixth straight month, may need Bloomberg’s financial support in key states to be competitive against Trump - a case that Bloomberg can and is already making to superdelegates as Sanders begins the long struggle of eclipsing that 50% mark.

As such, a parallel is emerging that resembles Trump’s pursuit in 2016 to avoid a brokered convention, in which a disgruntled RNC was ready to nominate Cruz or Kasich. A brokered convention is more likely to happen this year because delegates are awarded proportionally in each state instead of winner-take-all, and Bloomberg will use his wallet against Sanders to ensure this happens.

However, if a brokered convention rejects Sanders on the second ballot, all hell would break loose. Trump would be the beneficiary of a fractured Democrat Party, negating all of the money Bloomberg would have spent to ensure Trump’s defeat.

Robert Dimuro

Posted on February 23, 2020 10:54

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Source: NYT
2

The former mayor knows that presidential campaign history is littered with failed runs by third-party candidates.

THE LATEST THINKING

Video Site Tour

The Latest
The Latest

Subscribe to THE LATEST Newsletter.

The Latest
The Latest

Share this TLT through...

The Latest