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Bernie Sanders' Lead as Democratic Front-Runner Causes Tension Among Moderate Voters

Karagan Knowles

Posted on February 25, 2020 10:52

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His continued success splits the party between the other candidates and causes non-supporters to dread if he is chosen as the next presidential nominee.

Sen. Bernie Sanders is an undeniable front-runner after his win in the Nevada caucuses, but his growing emergence triggers apprehension among moderates in the Democratic party.

The growing fears of non-Bernie supporters result around Sanders' Democratic Socialism and embrace for Medicare for All. These certain set of political views make Sanders stand out against his rivals and cause red flags for moderate voters who think that his views might be "too far left".

After a virtual tie for first place in Iowa against former South Bend Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg, and a first place win in New Hampshire followed by his victory in Nevada, moderates are very aware that Sanders now leads as the race's front-runner.

Warnings surround Sanders and his presidential campaign. These warnings are claiming that the party faces "too big a risk" with the policies that Sanders would implement if he was in office and the controversies that would follow. According to CBS News and the YouGov polls released on Sunday, Sanders has a solid lead nationally and is closing the gap on former vice president Joe Biden in South Carolina.

These polls show Sanders with 28 percent nationwide, followed by Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren with 19 percent, Bide with 13 percent, and Buttigieg with 10 percent.

Sanders' victories in the previous caucuses make him a top target for his Democratic rivals. On Sunday, Buttigieg outed Sanders during his speech in front of thousands of people gathered at a high school football field in Arlington, Virginia. He said that Sanders' use of online 'combat' is not what the American people should nominate as the next presidential nominee.

"Politics will be fierce sometimes, but it is not combat," Buttigieg said in his speech.

Biden also indirectly outed Sanders on Saturday, stating that the Senator is not a member of the Democratic party, but rather an Independent. He went on to say, "I ain't a socialist. I'm not a plutocrat. I'm a Democrat." This statement to his supporters instigated the idea that Sanders is not a member of the party that he is seeking to represent in November and that moderate voters will not support him as the nominee of the Democratic party.

Whilst most Democrats have growing angst about Sanders' lead, Republicans seem to be pleased that Bernie is doing so well. President Donald Trump congratulated Sanders on his Nevada victory Saturday night. He followed this congratulation by calling the senator "Crazy Bernie."

"They [the Democratic leaders] don't want Bernie Sanders to represent them," Trump said. "It sounds like its '16 all over again for Bernie Sanders."

As Bernie Sanders continues his nationwide lead, closes gaps in South Carolina voting and the votes on Super Tuesday, one thing is clear for the Democratic party: whoever wins the nomination has their work cut out for them -- at least until the party can reach a common ground of support.

Karagan Knowles

Posted on February 25, 2020 10:52

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