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Benefits of Reading

Maria Dorado

Posted on August 6, 2020 19:38

3 users

A discussion of some positive outcomes from reading regardless of one's age.

I wish I was someone who could say I was read to as a child and developed a passion for literature as a result. I wish I could say I loved to read in general as a child. However, none of that would be true and that’s okay. I think a lot of the time there’s this misconception that you develop a love for literature early on or not at all. That’s not always true. We can fall in love with reading at any age, which is such a crucial habit to develop.


While I did occasionally read a book when I was in elementary school due to Scholastic book fairs and my fascination with vampires, it was a rare occurrence that wouldn’t really become a habit until I was around thirteen or fourteen years old. Despite literature causing me to care more about the stories I was reading than what I was learning about in science class at the time, there were so many benefits I saw from reading in the following years so no one can judge me terribly for that priority. 


For one, it helped me be able to focus more on what was being said to me. This is something I always struggled with as a child because I was the kind of child who was uncomfortable sitting still and had a terrible attention span as a result. When I gained an interest in reading, it helped me sit still more (even if I was constantly rearranging my reading position) and just focus on the book and on that day’s choice of background noise. 


It also helped me gain more of an interest in psychology because I would psychoanalyze most of the characters in my favorite books. This was especially helpful when I was taking AP Psychology because it made it easier for me to understand aspects of it if I was just relating it back to the plot of my favorite series. 


It also applies for most passions you may have throughout your life — depending on your learning style — because it may be easier to remember information when you have an emotional connection with something related to it. 


I think one of the biggest effects reading had on me was making me feel more comfortable talking to people, specifically strangers or simple acquaintances, given that I was someone who was bullied as a child and found it harder to trust people my age for that reason. It’s easier to gain that confidence when you feel like you have something worth talking about, especially during middle school and high school. 


As a side note, I want to briefly add that not everyone has the resources to buy books, which is why supporting libraries are so important and why people shouldn’t be shamed for not reading at an early age. 


You can also find more benefits of reading on HuffPost or Healthline!

Maria Dorado

Posted on August 6, 2020 19:38

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Source: Mental Floss

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