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Because, Mr. President, You Work for Us

Robin Alexander

Posted on January 4, 2018 11:55

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Here are a few minor “housekeeping” laws that Congress should pass before tackling infrastructure, DACA, Iran, or North Korea. Why? Frankly, I don’t know any employees who are allowed to take as many vacation days as they damn well please. Do you?

Sometimes it’s helpful to take care of those small, niggling, relatively insignificant things before starting on the big. For example, before I cook a feast for fifteen, the kitchen must be clean and organized; before I sit down to write, dirty clothes must be placed in the washing machine and clean ones folded and placed in the bedroom. You get the picture. So here's a few minor “housekeeping” laws that Congress should pass before tackling infrastructure, DACA, Iran, or North Korea.

1. All candidates for president must undergo a complete physical. Upon becoming president, he or she must undergo an annual physical. All such physicals are to be administered by a different designated military doctor each time, and one who is not known to the president until the actual appointment. (Employees who take drug tests don’t get to pick the lab where they have it done).

2. The IRS will release official copies of the prior 12 years of tax returns, whether or not there are audits in progress, for all presidential candidates. (I don’t know about you, but I want to know what they’ve been up to. It’s not unusual for a high-level job to require a background criminal and financial check).

3. All presidents and any adult member of the family must place all business assets in a blind trust for the duration of the presidency, to be administered by a government-appointed administrator. (This is about serving the country, not profiting from that service).

4. Number three applies to any charitable organizations founded and/or run by a president or any adult member of the family.

5. The immediate family of all presidents must reside in the White House, starting on the day of inauguration and ending on the day the president officially moves out. (I see no reason why taxpayers should pay for extra Secret Service, nor why an American neighborhood should be inconvenienced on a daily basis. Yes, an employer may pay moving costs, but there are limits).

6. All presidents, their immediate family, and any other family members who wish to receive Secret Service protection must adhere to an established number of vacation days per year. (Frankly, I don’t know any employees who are allowed to take as many vacation days as they damn well please. Do you?)

7. No president may profit from having held the office for a pre-determined period of time after leaving office. That includes book deals, speeches, employment as a lobbyist, or anything other than his/her regular employment. (Many employees sign non-compete clauses. Same thing).

8. Number seven applies to all federal office holders, top level administrators and cabinet members.

9.  And finally, all federal office holders must be subject to the same regulations pertaining to health benefits as the rest of us. When out of office, the health benefits end . . . except with COBRA. (Seriously.)

Robin Alexander

Posted on January 4, 2018 11:55

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Source: NYT

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