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Bathroom Practices

Randy DeVaul

Posted on May 17, 2019 22:01

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Your bathroom can be one of the most dangerous rooms in your house. Children drowning, parents being electrocuted, grandparents falling and breaking bones - it can be just a regular torture chamber! Read up on the hazards listed below and take steps to be safe at home.

One of the most dangerous and scary rooms in the house is the bathroom. At least, you would think so when it’s time for my kids to take a bath.  Water, drugs, electricity, cosmetics, and slippery (when wet) surfaces combine to make potentially fatal events.

Children can drown in water that is less than an inch deep. Add the hot water controls for the tub and shower being within reach while taking a bath, and an unsupervised child could easily be burned. Then there is the discovered phenomenon of “the slide.” That’s when the child starts at the back of the curved tub and slides into the faucets. Having non-skid strips in the bottom of the tub eliminates that practice. Those strips also help getting out of the tub, since the unexpected thrill of “the slide” does not carry with it the same level of fun as while in the tub.

If they survive the bath (literally), they have to get wet feet onto the floor while remaining upright. A bath mat or a non-slip surface (not a free-moving towel), to step onto when getting out of the tub, is important. For both children and adults, you may also want to have grab bars. If so, make sure they are securely mounted to the wall. 

Cleaning supplies, chemicals, medications, razors and razor blades (hopefully not in the children’s bathroom, if you have the luxury of extra rooms) all lend to the lure and charm to small children. Place these materials in a secure place to restrict access to them.

Does your bathroom have a GFCI – a ground fault circuit interrupter – outlet? If you live in an older home, you may not have one. A GFCI outlet has the three-prong receptacle and a “test” button built in to it. If water splashes into the receptacle or on the electrical appliance, such as a blow dryer or curling iron, the GFCI stops the electrical flow and prevents shock. You can install (or have one installed) for a reasonable price and it is well worth the protection level that comes with it. If you plan to install your own, however, make sure you know how to do it before you start (we’ll save that one for another article). Suffice it to say, don’t get killed installing a protection device.

Check the water temperature from your tub or sink. It should be below 120 degrees F. If not, you need to lower the temperature at the water heater. Again, know how to do that before you try it. Also, teach your children to turn the cold water on first and off last to prevent burns.

Take a few minutes right now to inspect your bathroom for hazards. Once you know what they are, you can begin to protect yourself and your family from those hazards so you and yours remain safe at home.

Randy DeVaul

Posted on May 17, 2019 22:01

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Source: KFYO 790

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