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An Incredibly Compendious Glimpse at the Struggles of the Millennial Generation

Robert Franklin

Posted on December 5, 2018 11:49

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Gen Xers and Baby Boomers like to pretend they are authorities on the Millennial generation. All they're doing is perpetuating myths that have real world consequences for the subject of those myths.

There's a prevailing psychosis among the preceding generations relating to the supposed deficiencies of millennials. We're considered lazy and entitled. We're accused of burning American culture at the stake and chanting "we are woke" over the ashes. Every week, it seems some manager has an anecdote about why a millennial blew a job interview, some news site or periodical publishes a thousand words devoted to whatever thing millennials are alleged to be killing this week, and some Gen X-pert appears on cable news with "insight" into why millennials are the "participation trophy" generation.

While I cannot say in totality that there are not those within my generation who perhaps do exhibit some of those traits, I can say that criticisms lobbed at all of us from both my parents' and grandparents' generations are misplaced words and misguided attitudes.

Aside from the fact that throughout history the preceding generations always throw shade at the newest one, many of the issues older generations have with millennials are perfect examples of how easy it is to entirely miss the point.

The truth is being a millennial in modern America kind of sucks. Prospects are dim. Stability is uncertain. Our futures seem to be okay on a Wednesday, then turn gloomy by the following Monday. Millennials are coming of age during a time when economic culture is a labyrinth of moral ambiguity, where we are distrusted by supply-side employers who, interestingly enough, need us to bolster their workforce and help it adapt into the technological future.

And that distrust is mutual.

There are 39 million Americans aged 26 to 34. This is my age demographic. Assuming what I deduced from what I witnessed during my late-adolescence and early-adulthood is typical for this age group, millennials have every reason to be skeptical of damn near everyone. We watched the President of the United States manipulate public fear to launch an illegal war based on a lie. We watched the banks, the housing market, and the job market all collapse under the weight of their overseer's wallets. Education is excessively expensive, thus more difficult to obtain. This forced us to go to work, where employers are conditioned to get as much as possible for as little as possible, and bully employees into voluntarily signing away their rights as a condition of employment.

Meanwhile, nothing is being done to drain this swamp.

With millennials trapped inside an economic gulag, the preceding generations have taken it upon themselves to belittle and slander them, never once considering that perhaps we want the same things they did, but the system cultivated by those previous generations has crippled such societal acquisitions. For many of us, the lack of available resources is why we're allegedly killing the diamond industry and why we're putting off families, not selfishness, laziness, or arrogance.

Perhaps the pawn shop will give me a few bucks for that participation trophy my folks awarded me after my winless youth soccer season? Gotta pay rent.

Robert Franklin

Posted on December 5, 2018 11:49

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Source: The Guardian

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