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Album Review: Man On The Moon III by Kid Cudi

Gloria Ukaoma

Posted on December 27, 2020 02:53

3 users

The latest addition to the Man on the Moon Saga

Just two weeks ago, Kid Cudi released Man on the Moon III: The Chosen. I've spent quite a few hours listening to it, and I've come to like it. However, like his last big release Passion, Pain, and Demon Slayin', there are a few tracks that break the record's immersion.

First, I would like to say that I was a big fan of PPDS. That is saying something, considering my usual indifference to Kid Cudi's albums. He has a lot of great singles, but for a very long time, I wasn't interested in sitting to listen to an hour-long album. That changed with the advent of PPDS.

In response to the harsh reception of Speeding Bullet to Heaven, Cudi moved back towards his usual techno/synth-beat sound. That sound was developed through PPDS and has reached a beautiful maturity on Man on the Moon III. Tracks like She Knows This, Damaged, and Show Out really emphasize the almost transcendental sound of the music. These songs are really a testament to the strength of the first half of the album. In a nod to more mainstream rap, Cudi also includes a feature with Trippie Redd. The dripping lyrics of this track make it reminiscent of mumble rap while still providing Cudi's elegant lyrics.

Or mostly elegant. Tracks like Solo Dolo Part III and Elsie's Baby Boy don't quite fit the rest of the album in terms of lyrical flow. I understand the need to experiment, but these songs would have benefitted from better pacing. They are rather slow and lulling on an album that is predominantly fast, short, and sweet songs. Of course, this is just my personal opinion. I really do love the album as a whole, and despite what I say about these songs, they do contribute something to the overall record. In terms of lyrical content, they present a deeper view into Kid Cudi's struggle with his mental health. It is a recurring theme on most of his projects, and I value his choice to reveal so much emotion.

As a stylistic choice, the samples at the beginning of some tracks seem wholly unnecessary. They do not build upon the story present in the lyrics so much as they distract the listener. I don't mind them too much, but sometimes I just want to get to the actual song. Maybe the album would have benefitted from shortening the dialogue excerpts. 

And finally, my favorite part. I've wanted to discuss this since I first heard the album: the hums. Passion, Pain, and Demon Slayin' was often cited as being full of hums, and that is a very accurate observation. I personally love his "cosmic hums" and they add another vein of emotion to the confessional nature of his music.

So if you haven't listened to Man on the Moon III: The Chosen yet, please do yourself a favor and give it a try. If the hums don't entice you, then nothing will.

Gloria Ukaoma

Posted on December 27, 2020 02:53

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Before the release of his new album 'Man on the Moon III,' Kid Cudi sat down with Zane Lowe of Apple Music. Here's everything...

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