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A Tribute to Gibson

John Turnbull

Posted on May 6, 2018 16:51

1 user

An American Icon files for Chapter 11

It's a sad, sad day and a sign of the impending musicalypse when an American Institution such as Gibson Guitars files for bankruptcy protection. Not many ever thought they'd see that day, but it happened this past week. Instead of lamenting on why it happened or the pathetic state of today's music and musicians, I've decided to give tribute to Gibson's finest output — the Les Paul (although the Flying V is pretty darn cool, too) and some of the best guitarists who ever played one.

PETE TOWNSHEND. Singer/songwriter/wordsmith of one of the best bands ever, The Who. He's since switched to a Fender Strat, but back in the days when The Who was Meaty, Beaty, Big and Bouncy (ie. "Live at Leeds"), his No. 1 was a black Les Paul.

JIMMY PAGE. Was there any rock pose cooler than Mr. Page in his dragon outfit, kicking out his leg mid-strum while strumming his Gold Top Les Paul? I think not.

PETER FRAMPTON. Few who were in their tweens and early 20s during the "me" decade of 1970s didn't have a copy of Frampton Comes Alive. With his golden locks and equally golden Les Paul, Frampton's soundtrack was probably responsible for many babies born in the '70s.

ACE FREHLEY. While doubtful he will ever be placed on the same pedestal of guitar wizardry as others in this article, Ace and his pyroctechnic Les Paul still mesmorized an army of boys (and some girls) who all wanted to be guitar/superheroes.

BOB MARLEY. It's impossible to deny the impact that Reggae had on pop music, and Mr. Marley and his Les Paul Junior with the P90 pickups certainly led the way.

RANDY RHOADS. With the exception of Edward Van Halen, no '80s shredder had more influence on up-and-coming guitarists than this tiny man and his beautiful white Les Paul.

SLASH. Possibly the last of the true rock guitar heroes, at least in the foreseeable future, Slash hacked and squealed his way through some of the best of late '80s hair metal, and he did it with a take-no-prisoner attitude that Gibson has always had and what is sorely missing in music today.

Gibson will bounce back and without bail-out aid, which only seems to go to banks and companies that aren't artistic or creative. But one could do worse than go out and pick up at least an Epiphone to help reinvigorate a historic and truly great American company.

John Turnbull

Posted on May 6, 2018 16:51

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Source: Mashable

Mashable's Chris Perkins tests out the 2016 Gibson Les Paul Standard High Performance and its robot tuner. Read more......

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