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A Review of 'Little Women'

Madi Keezer

Posted on November 15, 2020 13:49

4 users

By the end, "Little Women" had me wanting to write a novel in 19th century Massachusetts, paint a masterpiece in France, and hug my sisters, all at the same time. Beware, spoilers ahead.

I walked into the theater with no expectations, having never read nor seen any rendition of "Little Women." In fact, the only reason I watched it was because of my sister's Timothee Chalamet obsession. Two hours later, I, too, loved Timothee. He had introduced me to my favorite movie of all time.

All in all, "Little Women" is a story about childhood and its end. The movie switches from telling the story of the March's childhoods to their adult lives. Although there are no captions telling viewers what year it is, the childhood scenes capture the joy and innocence of being a child so well that it's impossible to be confused. The lighting and exaggerated saturation in the shots capture the idealism of one's youth. When "Little Women" then jumps to the March sisters' adult lives, the colors dampen and the music slows. The shot that really hit me was the beach scene. A straight cut switches sparkling water, blue skies, kites, and picnic baskets to the world of gray sand and gray clouds that frame Jo and Beth quietly sitting on a blanket. Director Greta Gerwig does a wonderful job of capturing the idealistic joy of childhood and the corresponding melancholy dullness that it leaves behind.

I left "Little Women" in tears. Hardly anyone else did. Without giving away too many spoilers, I think the film had me, specifically, more emotional because of the sisterly bond it features. Being a triplet with two sisters, it was all too familiar. Gerwig captures the unique bond between sisters to the tee. The bickering, screaming and not being able to hold a grudge with each other definitely hit close to home. Even the way the sisters banter and move gracefully around one another, as if all their minds are on the same frequency, tuned from years of practice, was familiar. If my sisters weren't sitting next to me watching "Little Women," with iconic shots like the sisters icing Meg's foot, huddled around their mother reading their father's letter, and walking to school, it would definitely have made me miss them. After all, the truest line in the film is, "Life is too short to be mad at one's sisters."

The big complaint with "Little Women" was that Jo and Laurie did not end up together. But, as Jo says, they would kill each other as a couple. They are both too similar, two idealistic dreamers. Jo and Laurie are obvious soulmates, but platonic ones. Laurie and Amy are a better match. While not soulmates, they still love each other. Although some viewers find this boring, I think it contributes to one of the themes of the film: that there is importance in the mundane. Not everything is an epic, soul-shattering, soulmate type of love. While it's unsatisfying, it is also true. "Little Women" was a gorgeous movie with more contributing aspects and themes than I could possibly fit in this review, and I would recommend it to anyone and everyone.

Madi Keezer

Posted on November 15, 2020 13:49

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Source: Screen Rant
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Legendary actress Olivia de Havilland, star of Gone With the Wind and two-time Academy Award winner has died at age 104....

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