The Latest

THE LATEST

THE LATEST THINKING

THE LATEST THINKING

The opinions of THE LATEST’s guest contributors are their own.

A Few Thoughts on the Importance of 1960s Counterculture Music

Robert Franklin

Posted on September 4, 2019 23:52

0 user

For a kid who realized a love of music in the 1990s and spent part of the 2000s pursuing a career in the field, the music that defined the protest culture of baby boomers has had a noteworthy hold on my creativity.

I was born in 1987. By the time I came around, Woodstock was old enough to join the Army.

Needless to say, my tastes in music developed in the 1990s, which, incidentally, was another decade with an explosive musical counterculture that came to define the ethos of those who lived in it.

Even though I was born decades later, I've spent most of my life with a strong attachment to music from the late-1960s. Interestingly, it reminds me of the music that developed during my childhood -- in theme, experimentation, and cultural atmosphere.

Alternative rock in the 1990s bore remarkable sonic similarities to the psychedelic moods of off-mainstream hooks of the late-60s, though it was largely apolitical (with the exception of Pearl Jam). Both periods of music, however, had a certain mood, a cultural texture, tailor-made to exemplify the angst of a generation of young people struggling to find their place in the world.

The Beatles, for example, remind me of Radiohead. The careers of both bands can be neatly split between a more radio-friendly sound prevalent in the first part of their existence, followed by a sudden jump into experimentation and significant pushing of accepted genre boundaries. For Radiohead, this would be the transition from albums like Pablo Honey and The Bends to Kid A and In Rainbows. For the Beatles, this would be the transition from albums like Please Please Me and A Hard Day's Night to Revolver and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Songs like "No Time" by The Guess Who, "White Room" by Cream, and "Corporal Clegg" by Pink Floyd had as profound an impact on me as a songwriter as '90s riffs like "Buzzards and Dreadful Crows" by Guided by Voices, "Soon" by My Bloody Valentine, and "Cherub Rock" by Smashing Pumpkins.

The only other time period in rock music, aside from the 1990s, that sourced inspiration for the musician in me is the late-1960s. There are textures and timbre in Disraeli Gears, Electric Music for the Mind and Body, and The Velvet Underground & Nico that are so beautifully arranged, awe-inspiring, and transgressive, they cling to my imagination and fuel creative sparks.

While I was a full-time musician, I listened to Odyssey and Oracle as often as I queued up Nevermind, which should be fitting, considering "Time of the Season" and "Smells Like Teen Spirit" are both considered quintessential, generation-defining pieces of music.

And to think, I likely owe my affinity for '60s psychedelic music, and ultimately my short-lived career in music, at least in part, to my grandmother. After all, she started it by exposing me to Jefferson Airplane.

Robert Franklin

Posted on September 4, 2019 23:52

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Source: Deadline

Veteran TV exec Tim Bock has been named SVP of Production, Unscripted & Alternative at IM Global Television . In his new...

THE LATEST THINKING

Video Site Tour

The Latest
The Latest

Subscribe to THE LATEST Newsletter.

The Latest
The Latest

Share this TLT through...

The Latest